Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Incentives to combat Cheating in Class

In the case where a student gets caught cheating, how harsh should the punishment be? When a student can get caught cheating on a test, get a 0 for that test and still pass that class with an A, there needs to be harsher punishment (The Washington Post, https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/2001/10/28/students-can-often-cheat-their-punishment/e2c2f081-ee31-414a-adf9-39f365ffe551/, 2001). Students should face massive repercussions for making such a poor choice and not be able to finish the class with an A. This is proof that we need to create harsher punishments, because if getting caught cheating barely effects your grade then students will continue doing it.

Cheating may not always have to be combated with harsh punishment. Perhaps if students were given positive incentives not to cheat, they would not cheat. If a student is rewarded for long streaks of good behavior/not cheating, then they will more likely stay on that path and continue to not cheat (Bear Market Review, https://bearmarketreview.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/to-cheat-or-not-to-cheat-that-is-the-incentive/, 2013). Instead of giving the students who are on the right path no reward and making the students who cheat serve a punishment, it would make more sense and yield better results to reward those who do not cheat. We must make sure the students doing the right thing feel proud and rewarded for doing so.

I feel we should use a combination of both positive and negative incentives in order to stop cheating. We should allow students who do not cheat extra privileges decided by the teacher; like a homework pass where the student would not have to do homework one time. I also think that there needs to be substantial repercussions for those caught cheating. Cheaters should get a 0 on the test, have their grade dropped 10% after the 0% on the test, and have to stay after school for a week and help do work where needed. I believe this combination of positive and negative incentives could help reduce the number of cheaters in school.

3 comments:

  1. I agree that there should be substantial repercussions for those who cheat. However I don't believe we should reward students who don't cheat. Those who don't cheat should be rewarded by the grade they recieve, or how hard they worked. Rewards for hard work should come later , such as a scholarship, recommendations, and if you truly work hard you will be rewarded with a good job and a high wage.

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  2. I disagree with you, putting any positive incentives for those who do not cheat will give extra benefits to those who do not get caught but still cheat. If I as a student were to cheat on a test and not get caught I would not only get good grades but also receive the positive incentive. By giving positive incentives you are increasing the reward as well as the risk however, if you were to propose only negative incentives you would only increase the risk not the reward.

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  3. I disagree with you, putting any positive incentives for those who do not cheat will give extra benefits to those who do not get caught but still cheat. If I as a student were to cheat on a test and not get caught I would not only get good grades but also receive the positive incentive. By giving positive incentives you are increasing the reward as well as the risk however, if you were to propose only negative incentives you would only increase the risk not the reward.

    ReplyDelete

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